4/5/09

Revisiting an Old Project...


I'm not giving out too many details just yet, but I will disclose that I'm improving my supersonic design. It should be able to withstand higher airspeeds, so the motor of choice will hopefully be the 137 N-sec G80, the most powerful single use model rocket motor available. If I'm brave, I might even build a payload bay for either an altimeter, an accelerometer, or a camera...


On the simulations, this model reaches a maximum velocity of 1,700 ft/s (almost mach 1.5). Scary, isn't it? It requires VERY different construction and design. My last experience has encouraged me to try again with even more ambition than before.


I'm going to write a new post on supersonic travel soon!

5 comments:

David said...

Trying to start up a Google maps mash up so that people can post good model rocket launching sites in their area. One of the hardest parts in starting out in model rocketry is finding out where you can launch.
If you can help then go to A-Mach Time's Model Rocket Launch Sites Google Map and contribute!
Tell your friends! Spread the word!

http://a-machtime.blogspot.com/2009/04/model-rocket-launch-sites-google-map.html

If you have any questions or comments we appreciate them.

R2K said...

Smaller fins, and as short as possible!

http://www.rocketreviews.com/reviews/all/oop_imp_mach_buster.shtml

DTH Rocket said...

True, but you also have to realize that this rocket is going to be extremely tail-heavy. Apparently swept fins are pretty effiecient on supersonic vehicles because of the way the shock wave is distributed over them, and that would improve stability as well. But yes, you are right. The fin should be as small (and durable!) as I can get them.

R2K said...

See swept fins are very common in pro. level rockets. But in the hobby people always go for clipped fins.

The EGE said...

I've gone for clipped fins on my machbuster. I'm using pretty crappy 1/8" 3-ply and I don't think and protruding corners would survive the flutter. The only problem is that I had to make rather large fins, as the clipped shape tends to produce smaller fin areas.

ShareThis